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Cerulean Gravity

this doesn't taste like chocolate
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You bring the matI’ll bring the Adventure.

You bring the mat
I’ll bring the Adventure.

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Studio Still-life: self portrait 
Cornish, NH

Studio Still-life: self portrait
Cornish, NH

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companion 1 |kəmˈpanyən|
noun
1 a person or animal with whom one spends a lot of time or with whom one travels : his traveling companion | figurative fear became my constant companion.
• a person who shares the experiences of another, esp. when these are unpleasant or unwelcome : my companions in misfortune.
• a person with similar tastes and interests to one’s own and with whom one has a friendly relationship : drinking companions.
• a person’s long-term sexual partner outside marriage.
• a person, esp. an unmarried or widowed woman, employed to live with and assist another.
• Astronomy a star, galaxy, or other celestial object that is close to or associated with another.
2 one of a pair of things intended to complement or match each other : [as adj. ] a companion volume.
• [usu. in names ] a book that provides information about a particular subject : the Oxford Companion to English Literature.
• Brit., dated a piece of equipment containing objects used in a particular activity : a traveler’s companion.
3 ( Companion) a member of the lowest grade of certain orders of knighthood.
verb [ trans. ] formal
accompany : he is companioned by a pageboy.
ORIGIN Middle English : from Old French compaignon, literally ‘one who breaks bread with another,’ based on Latin com- ‘together with’ + panis ‘bread.’
companion 2
noun Nautical
a covering over the hatchway leading below decks.
• archaic a raised frame with windows on the quarterdeck of a ship to allow light into the decks below.
• short for companionway .

ORIGIN mid 18th cent.: from obsolete Dutch kompanje (earlier form of kampanje) ‘quarterdeck,’ from Old French compagne, from Italian (camera della) compagna ‘(storeroom for) provisions.’

companion|kəmˈpanyən|

noun

a person or animal with whom one spends a lot of time or with whom one travels : his traveling companion | figurative fear became my constant companion.

a person who shares the experiences of another, esp. when these are unpleasant or unwelcome : my companions in misfortune.

a person with similar tastes and interests to one’s own and with whom one has a friendly relationship : drinking companions.

a person’s long-term sexual partner outside marriage.

a person, esp. an unmarried or widowed woman, employed to live with and assist another.

Astronomy a star, galaxy, or other celestial object that is close to or associated with another.

one of a pair of things intended to complement or match each other : [as adj. ] a companion volume.

[usu. in names ] a book that provides information about a particular subject : the Oxford Companion to English Literature.

Brit., dated a piece of equipment containing objects used in a particular activity : a traveler’s companion.

( Companion) a member of the lowest grade of certain orders of knighthood.

verb [ trans. ] formal

accompany : he is companioned by a pageboy.

ORIGIN Middle English : from Old French compaignon, literally ‘one who breaks bread with another,’ based on Latin com- ‘together with’ + panis ‘bread.’

companion 2

noun Nautical

a covering over the hatchway leading below decks.

archaic a raised frame with windows on the quarterdeck of a ship to allow light into the decks below.

short for companionway .

ORIGIN mid 18th cent.: from obsolete Dutch kompanje (earlier form of kampanje) ‘quarterdeck,’ from Old French compagne, from Italian (camera della) compagna ‘(storeroom for) provisions.’

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control |kənˈtrōl|

noun

the power to influence or direct people’s behavior or the course of events : the whole operation is under the control of a production manager | the situation was slipping out of her control.

the ability to manage a machine or other moving object : he lost control of his car | improve your ball control.

the restriction of an activity, tendency, or phenomenon : pest control.

the power to restrain something, esp. one’s own emotions or actions : give children time to get control of their emotions.

(often controls) a means of limiting or regulating something : growing controls on local spending.

a switch or other device by which a machine is regulated : the volume control.

the place where a particular item is verified : passport control.

the base from which a system or activity is directed : communications could be established with central control | mission control.

Bridge a high card that will prevent opponents from establishing a particular suit.

Computing short for control key .

Statistics a group or individual used as a standard of comparison for checking the results of a survey or experiment : they saw no difference between the cancer patients and the controls.

a member of an intelligence organization who personally directs the activities of a spy.

verb ( -trolled , -trolling )

[ trans. ] determine the behavior or supervise the running of : he was appointed to control the company’s marketing strategy.

maintain influence or authority over : you shouldn’t have dogs if you can’t control them.

limit the level, intensity, or numbers of : he had to control his temper.

( control oneself) remain calm and reasonable despite provocation : he made an effort to control himself.

regulate (a mechanical or scientific process) : the airflow is controlled by a fan.

[as adj. ] ( controlled) (of a drug) restricted by law with respect to use and possession : a sentence for possessing controlled substances.

Statistics [ intrans. ] ( control for) take into account (an extraneous factor that might affect results) when performing an experiment : no attempt was made to control for variations | [as adj. ] ( controlled) a controlled trial.

check; verify.

PHRASES

in control able to direct a situation, person, or activity : I felt calm and in control.

out of control no longer possible to manage : fires burning out of control.

under control (of a danger or emergency) being dealt with successfully and competently : it took two hours to bring the blaze under control.

DERIVATIVES

controllability |kənˌtrōləˈbilitē| noun

controllable adjective

controllably |-əblē| adverb

ORIGIN late Middle English (as a verb in the sense [check or verify accounts,] esp. by referring to a duplicate register): from Anglo-Norman French contreroller ‘keep a copy of a roll of accounts,’ from medieval Latin contrarotulare, from contrarotulus ‘copy of a roll,’ from contra- ‘against’ + rotulus ‘a roll.’ The noun is perhaps via French contrôle.

pressure |ˈpre sh ər|

noun

the continuous physical force exerted on or against an object by something in contact with it : the slight extra pressure he applied to her hand.

the force exerted per unit area : gas can be fed to the turbines at a pressure of around 250 psi.

the use of persuasion, influence, or intimidation to make someone do something : the proposals put pressure on Britain to drop its demand | the many pressures on girls to worry about their looks.

the influence or effect of someone or something : oil prices came under some downward pressure.

the feeling of stressful urgency caused by the necessity of doing or achieving something, esp. with limited time : you need to be able to work under pressure and not get flustered | some offenders might find prison a refuge against the pressures of the outside world.

verb [ trans. ]

attempt to persuade or coerce (someone) into doing something : it might now be possible to pressure him into resigning | [ trans. ] she pressured her son to accept a job offer from the bank.

ORIGIN late Middle English : from Old French, from Latin pressura, from press- ‘pressed,’ from the verb premere (see press ).

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