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Cerulean Gravity

this doesn't taste like chocolate

grief |grēf|

noun

deep sorrow, esp. that caused by someone’s death: she was overcome with grief.
• informal trouble or annoyance: they won’t give you any grief in the next few days.

PHRASES

come to grief have an accident; meet with disaster: many a ship has come to grief along this shore.
good grief! an exclamation of irritation, frustration, or surprise.

ORIGIN Middle English: from Old French grief, from grever ‘to burden’ (see grieve).

Bureau landscapes

Bureau landscapes

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El Cortijo, Burlington VT.

The most glorious peanut butter cup in all the land

Hotel Vermont

Hotel Vermont

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grace |grās|

noun 

simple elegance or refinement of movementshe moved through the water with effortless grace.

• courteous goodwill at least he has the grace to admit his debt to her.

• ( graces) an attractively polite manner of behaving she has all the social graces.

(in Christian belief) the free and unmerited favor of God, as manifested in the salvation of sinners and the bestowal of blessings.

• a divinely given talent or blessing the graces of the Holy Spirit.

• the condition or fact of being favored by someone he fell from grace because of drug use at the Olympics.

(also grace period) a period officially allowed for payment of a sum due or for compliance with a law or condition, esp. an extended period granted as a special favor another three days’ grace.

a short prayer of thanks said before or after a meal before dinner the Reverend Newman said grace.( His, Her, or Your Grace) used as forms of description or address for a duke, duchess, or archbishop His Grace, the Duke of Atholl.verb [ trans. do honor or credit to (someone or something) by one’s presence she bowed out from the sport she has graced for two decades.

• [ trans. (of a person or thing) be an attractive presence in or on; adorn Ms. Pasco has graced the front pages of magazines like Elle and Vogue.

PHRASES 

be in someone’s good (or bad) graces be regarded by someone with favor (or disfavor).there but for the grace of God ( go I) used to acknowledge one’s good fortune in avoiding another’s mistake or misfortune.the ( Three) Graces Greek Mythology three beautiful goddesses (Aglaia, Thalia, and Euphrosyne), daughters of Zeus. They were believed to personify and bestow charm, grace, and beauty with good (or bad) grace in a willing and happy (or reluctant and resentful) manner.

ORIGIN 

Middle English : via Old Frenchfrom Latin gratia, from gratus ‘pleasing, thankful’ ; related to grateful 

mislead |misˈlēd|

verb 

(past and past part. -led ) [ trans.cause (someone) to have a wrong idea or impression about someone or somethingthe government misled the public about the road’s environmental impact.

DERIVATIVES misleader noun

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design |dəˈzīn|

noun

a plan or drawing produced to show the look and function or workings of a building, garment, or other object before it is built or madehe has just unveiled his design for the new museum.

• the art or action of conceiving of and producing such a plan or drawinggood design can help the reader understand complicated information the cloister is of late twelfth century design.

• an arrangement of lines or shapes created to form a pattern or decorationpottery with a lovely blue and white design.

purpose, planning, or intention that exists or is thought to exist behind an action, fact, or material objectthe appearance of design in the universe. 

verb

[trans.decide upon the look and functioning of (a building, garment, or other object), typically by making a detailed drawing of ita number of architectural students were designing a factory [as adj. with submodifier(designed) specially designed buildings.

• (often be designed) do or plan (something) with a specific purpose or intention in mind[trans.the tax changes were designed to stimulate economic growth. See note at intend.

PHRASES

by design as a result of a plan; intentionallyI became a presenter by default rather than by design, have designs on aim to obtain (something desired), typically in a secret and dishonest wayhe suspected her of having designs on the family fortune.

ORIGIN 

late Middle English (as a verb in the sense [to designate] ): from Latin designare ‘to designate,’ reinforced by French désigner. The noun is via French from Italian.

Official labels are official

Official labels are official

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